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20121201
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stakeholders' liked iran and russia. >>thank you for your answers. i'm looking for something a little bit more specific. what is the relation between the new coalition and the military council? do you think they can become an administrative body for the revolution or a government in exile as you just described? >> is there a follow-up question? >> the new coalition actually put three things they have to do. the first to form a new government and to form a military council, and in the third thing the to play a role in the humanitarian assistance or humanitarian aid. the debate right now within the new coalition, are we able to form a government until we get it in guarantees from the international community, suc. restated three examples before of government in exile. if there is no recognition of the international community, there is nothing the government in exile can do. the second thing is the financial assistance. i said before, after the formation of the serbian national council, six months we don't have what we need to do. you cannot work as a workin exile with individual budgets. the rela
. but there is a vote going on on the senate floor a vote on the russia trade bill, that's under way. it may postpone senator mccain's comments just a bit. you heard senator reid, leader reid, asked about the resignation of jim demint who announced he's resigning to take over the conservative think tank the heritage foundation. he'll resign effective january 1. he was first elected to the senate in 2004. the senate is in today. they're voting on the russia trade bill. they have a couple of judicial nominations as well, after that, the -- legislatively that ought to do it for the senate. we're staying live here in the senate radio and tv gallery, expecting senator john mccain to come out shortly for a briefing. later at about 1:30, we'll take you live to a conference looking a at the arab spring and nuclear proliferation and later at 4:30 here in washington, the lighting of the national christmas tree, that's coming up for you this afternoon on c-span. the senate is in, votes under way on the russia trade bill, that's live on c-span 2. >> we expect senator mccain to be delayed just a little bit buzz o
deliberations ongoing between turkey and russia between the united states and russia, although we have not heard much of in the past few days for that might be. you have the joint u.s. and arab league on avoid talking about the need to rejuvenate something called the geneva plan, which was established back in june. all of these various activities are working toward or could work toward something we have not talked about, the potential for some kind of managed transition or negotiated transition. unfortunately, it is hard to place much stock or hope in these efforts given how often we have seen in the past some attempts that have failed. also given how volatile and quickly the situation on the ground is moving. how quickly the -- their taking over on the ground. as almost erased if whether these efforts can yield anything. -- it is almost a race to whether the efforts can yield anything. what does it mean that the government will not be able to win this militarily? it is significant. is that reflective of broader thinking within the government? i do not think so. the other issue is the russians.
were extraordinarily successful. archives began to open for western scholars. i worked a lot in russia during the 1990's, and i began to have the impression one of the other reasons they were open is because russians were so preoccupied with other things they did not care. as a young american woman, how could you beat walking around those archives? the idea was, she wants to look at those documents, so what? we are busy reforming our country. in 2000 putin became president of russia, and he became conscious of what history was told and how it was being told, and this trickle-down. he became more wary about what archives were opened and who had access to information. they are not totally closed, and you can still work in them. some of them become difficult, particularly the military archives. >> w bush came into the presidency. he made it difficult to get some for you could get access to his father. what is the difference between that attitude and what you have in these countries? is it a matter of degree, or do we have a different attitude? >> we believe in principle it should be open,
to open for western scholars. i worked a lot in russia during the 1990's, and i began to have the impression one of the other reasons they were open is because russians were so preoccupied with other things they did not care. as a young american woman, how could you beat walking around those archives? the idea was, she wants to look at those documents, so what? we are busy reforming our country. in 2002 and became president of russia, -- in 2000 putin became president of russia, and he became conscious of what history was told and how it was being told, and this trickle-down. he became more wary about what archives were opened and who had access to information. they are not totally closed, and you can still work in them. some of them become difficult, particularly the military archives. >> w bush came into the presidency. he made it difficult to get some for you could get access to his father. what is the difference between that attitude and what you have in these countries? is it a matter of degree, or do we have a different attitude? >> we believe in principle it should be o
relationship with russia. i think it was a vote on my behalf and others to say we would like a better relationship with the russian people and the russian government. this is an opportunity for russia to show that that vote was juft, this is an opportunity to show the international community at large you can be a constructive force at a time of great need and you have the capability to do some good. i find it ironic and red lines are talked about, but the red line here is literally red. the line we're crossing is 40,000 people have died. what bothers me is the most we are all fixated on the method of killing, not the killing itself. for over a year, we have been talking about getting involved and need to stop this before it gets out of hand. we want to shape what happens after assad leaves. it will be hard to go to the syrian people when they achieve their freedom and say we would like to help you and they will say, you did little at a time in our debatest need. we have a chance to correct that impression. from an american national security point of view, if we don't secure these chem
of things. russia has been a bad player here. we think maybe we can pull things away a little bit. it is a big plus that we have finally recognized code along with other countries the opposition. >> i want to pursue a little bit on what you said about helping to arm rebels in syria. what do you know -- >> their arms that are going to the rebels. we know that is happening. >> is the american government helping to facilitate that? >> think we know what is going on. i am not saying we're facilitating it, but we know that the rebels are getting the arms as they need. >> previously the obama administration said there redline was to see chemical weapons moved and prepared for use. now it seems that there redline is the actual use of these weapons. what do think the red line should be? >> @ think we have made it clear to assad that it is unacceptable to use these weapons, and i do not think he is going to do it. >> the obama administration has approved increased sanctions on iran. as the head of a democrat on the foreign affairs committee, how do you plan to move forward? do you plan to
serious they are. that's why i just asked consent to offer an amendment to the russia trade bill that gave them that opportunity. as i noted, i would be happy to have this vote here or as an amendment to the next bill or as a stand-alone. it will not slow down what i hope is swift passage for pntr for russia. if the president's proposal is made in good faith, our friends should be eager to vote for it. so i'm surprised the majority leader just declined the chance for them to support it with their votes. so i guess we're left to conclude that it couldn't even pass by a fair majority of votes and that they would rather take the country off the cliff than actually work out a good-faith agreement that reflects tough choices on both sides. to be fair to the secretary and to the president, we didn't just put together a bill that included his $2 trillion tax increase. we also added the almost $400 billion in new tax stimulus measures he wanted as well. this bill contains a continuation of the payroll tax holiday, a 10% credit on new wages that will go to businesses large and small, tanned include
had received a bundle of letters from schoolchildren in russia. and it reminded me that there was an incident in russia years ago where a gunman went into a schoolhouse and wantonly killed children and the monsignor was so touched by it, but that's the way this event has touched the world. i will tell you that this is a strong town, and you can feel the people of this community pulling together to support the survivors and thinking about how they can rebuild the town and its spirit. the first selectwoman said so pointedly the other night at the interfaith service that we will not allow this event to define newtown, connecticut, and they will not. but the families of those who have been lost have been changed forever. and it's in that regard that i particularly want to thank my colleagues for this resolution of condolence and support. i want to thank my colleague, senator reid, for the moment of silence yesterday in this chamber. in my faith tradition, when you visit a house of mourning, one of the customs is for the visitor to sitilently with the mourners. d it's ve
of the largest stockpiles in the world, they could be third after the u.s. and russia. there's not a lot of information on the exact location. options in terms of preemptively taking care of the chemical weapons are difficult. one option would be to send ground troops in. it is a hostile environment. the pentagon estimates there could be as many as 75,000 troops that would be needed to do that. another option would be to preemptively bomb but then you have dispersal of the agents and so forth. a third would try to seek some sort of property to go in and secure the site. it is a very difficult set of issues as president obama has clearly noted in the clip and has drawn a clear line on the use by the assaad regime. host: here is where syria is located in the middle east. adjacent to 11 on, i rock, and turkey. this civil war has not been going on 21 months. how has he been able to retain power? -- they are adjacent to lebanon, iraq, and turkey. guest: there have been times in the past when a bomb attack killed four members of his inner circle and people thought it could be the beginning of
. this marks 20 years since russia and the u.s. agreed to secure weapons in the former soviet state. leon panetta introduces the president at this event. >> thank you. [applause] midafternoon. senators, distinguished guests, ambassadors and officials, thank you all for being here today. i am honored to be able to participate in this symposium marking the 20th anniversary. let me thank the university for their great work in organizing today's conference. it has been a day to reflect on the successes that have been achieved in non-proliferation over the past two decades through the program, and it has been a particular honor to be when the company of senators whose leadership has made this possible. we can stay the course of history change for the better because these men helped the nation confronts the threat of nuclear proliferation at the end of the cold war. the world would have been a far more dangerous and threatening place were it not for these patriots. earlier this afternoon i was honored to be able to present the distinguished public service award, the highest civilian honor. he h
or three books and notepad and if for instance it is the week before the invasion of russia, mid june of 1941, i've got all the diaries piled up next to one chair, another of all the recollections, speeches churchill may have made, telegrams to roosevelt, warnings to stalin. and i approached it and i told bill phillips this -- host: your editor? guest: yes, my editor bill tphreupls. as if i was making a quilt. and i think this got a little off in the "new york times" artic article, that i would focus on that story that week, the invasion of russia. well, there was always something else happening that week, too. now we've two or three stories that have to be intertwined and i can't go down too far in the road to august of 1941 with the russian front and ca come all the way back to june 20 then go down to august with the african front. it wouldn't work. so, a read a lot. i bought harriman's memoirs. bill man westchester, in his notes, would xerox a page and cut out a little paragraph and 50 pages later you may find another paragraph from harriman's family worries but there was no contex
, it is the week before the invasion of russia, june 1941, i have all the diaries piled up next to one share. all of the recollections, the speeches churchill may have made, the telegrams to roosevelt, the warnings to stalin -- i approached it and i told bill phillips -- >> as your editor. >> my editor, bill phillips, as if i was making a quilt. this got a little off in the " new york times" article, but focusing on that week, the invasion of russia, there is always something else happening that week, so now we have two or three stories that have to be intertwined, and you cannot go too far down the road into august with the russian front and then come all the way back to june 20 again and then go all the way down to august with the african front and -- it would not work. so i read a lot. i bought the memoirs. bill manchester in his notes had xeroxed a page and cut out a paragraph. 50 pages later you might find another paragraph from the memoirs. but there is no contrast -- what team before and what came afterward. clearly bill wanted to paraphrase something from that excerpt, which kind of point
assume you were talking about soviet russia and nazi germany. were these regimes possible because of the uniformity? if that is the case, how did the myriad number of protestant denominations in the united states provide a unique defense against tyranny? >> i would not say -- i was not referring to just the soviet union and nazi germany. communist china killed far more of those two tyrannies combined, with no christian heritage to speak of. there are serious scholars that makes serious arguments that there is something and luther's temperament that was germanic. he was no democrat. the more, the merrier. religious factions or alternative sources of social authority. what you want is a society in which the state does not monopolized social authority. >> you talked extensively about religion in the united states contributing to [inaudible] there is one particular force that think they can inflict their views on this country. they insist said it was the intention of the founding fathers to create a christian equivalent of iran, which i do not think is the case. just because you are r
.c. andi have been working on rule of law for many years. in russia and china. the greatest threat to the chinese leadership feels is instability. social disharmony. the chinese people also have experienced a lot of difficult famous, including being jailed -- difficult things including being jailed legal profession. in our own country, lawyers and people have experienced a lot of pain in the civil rights movement. what would be a way to avoid these calamitous events and bring about the rule of law? >> we will not fire you. they might be willing to do that. if they did that, the judges would love it. nobody else would like it. but maybe they would do it. we have an administrative law rule. let's have all of the court proceedings on television. the proceedings. not the deliberations. let's not get into that. let's have the trials and all those things. maybe they would do that. what about the arbitration system? for revolving business situations --you are now paying them so much and you are not firing them. why don't we do it according to prepublished rules? there are so many things.
a tiny fraction of this to deal with china or russia t our nuclear arsenal isn't stopping iran from trying to achieve its nuclear weapon. these are sad, missed opportunities to right size the military which will still be the most powerful in the world by far. for us to deal with veterans' needs. mr. mcgovern: additional one minute. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman is recognized. mr. blumenauer: for us to deal with the threats that we face today, to deal with the damage that we have done in the misguided war in iraq. to be able to deal meaningfully with the guard and ready reserve that should be upgraded and healed from the damage that was inflicted upon him. we can provide far more real security, save tax dollars, deal with the needs of veterans that are about to be, sadly, undercut , and provide balance to our budget. because, in fact, the fiscal instability for reckless -- from reckless bills like that is in fact a national security threat. we are no longer going to be able to pay almost half the world's entire military budget. we should start by rejecting this authorization
about china's continental border with russia. what about china buying into actuallyand actually, wa colonizing siberia? how does that worry the united states, china getting stronger on account of siberia and throw a have not heard on any proposal? >> i have not heard of any proposals of china buying into siberia. >> oh, investment. >> united states once a prosperous china that assumes greater responsibility and engagement from the world commensurate with its capabilities and economic power. we do not want china simply to grow and take a free ride or get a free ride on everything else that is happening around world. china needs to step up and take a responsible role in managing international affairs, whether it is conflict in africa, to the middle east, to north korea, and elsewhere. we're seeing some of that already. there's good cooperation on many issues, including afghanistan, engagement with china on issues of north korea. we may not always agree, and certainly china has cut back its purchase of iranian oil and is working with united nations and united states on trying to dissua
debt. in 1994, he owed russia. the 1982 tax cuts, the bank reforms, that minimized our deductions for health care and let the health care costs skyrocket. then you have the savings and loan crisis. you could not write off your credit-card deductions. host: you were there for much of that debate. guest: a lot of that history that dave is mentioning is correct. there have been a lot of changes going on, ups and downs. the current debate is different, do not forget. after having surpluses at the end of the clinton administration, we went into debt almost a decade ago -- deficits almost a decade ago. the problems have gotten more difficult. at the moment, we have some interesting changes. you talk about 30 years since reagan. the country is getting older, so medicare, medicaid, social security costs more, but we have also had a lot of tax cuts. revenue is at the smallest amount since 1950. if we just got revenue back up to historical average, a deficit would be about $500 billion less than a career that is. the problem with that much more smaller. economists would then say that it is
in southern russia of some significance in 1774. so there must of had a lot of troops left over. they were approached obviously early in 1775. by june 1775, there is a report in one of the virginia newspapers that the crown was tried to hire russians. and they thought that -- that they had arranged, but it fell apart in the autumn of 1775, partly because frederick the great was telling catherine the great not to do it. and they were not fond of the notion of letting troops to go through german territory. at any event, it did not happen. after that, they had to turn to there werens -- the haiti about 50,000 german mercenaries, not all of the same time. >> i am jumping here, but, in the end, why do the patriots win? >> i think they won partly because it was such a challenge for the british from the start, the logistics' were enormously difficult, the number of the ships they needed, the number of troops. they did not have them. but even more than that, you had 13 colonies, large population, a number of them -- they had a lot of people who fought in previous wars. the british were not able to
occasionally to rent out. they had a war in southern russia of some significance in 1774, so they must of had a lot of troops left over that they had organized for that. they were approached early in 1775. by june of 1775 there's a report in one of the virginia newspapers that the crown is trying to hire russians. they thought they had it arranged, but it's all part then -- but it fell apart in the autumn of 1775 partly because frederick the great was telling catherine the great not to do it. there were not friendly to the notion of letting troops go through german territory. in any event, it did not happen. after that, they had returned to the hessians. they came from a number of german states. probably a total of 50,000 german mercenaries during the revolution all and all. >> in the end, why did the colonists or why did the patriots went? -- win? >> i think they won partly because it was such a challenge for the british. from the british the logistics were enormously difficult. the number of ships they needed, the number of troops, but did not have them. even more than that, you had 13 colo
as a tool for political and/or economic control that they want to exploit. for example, russia's putin has openly stated his intention to seek, and i'm quoting, international control over the internet using the monitoring and supervisory capabilities of the i.t.u., end quote. and just last week, the syrian government shut off internet access as the regime sought top suppress the free exchange of information among its private citizens. but it's because the internet is the ultimate tool of political and economic liberation that we should foster and protect it, not give those who fear its impact on politics and the economy the power to repress its continued innovation and untapped potential. i also want to make an important point about our legitimacy in the fight to keep the internet thrive democratic and decentralized. unfortunately, we did undermine our credibility when the federal communications commission imposed net neutrality regulations without the proper statutory authority to do so, even ambassador at the state department has made the point. he said in 2010 that the net neutrality pr
states like china and russia and others are stealing intellectual property at a rate that will be crippling for the next generation. i mean crippling. there is one company in the country that can contribute to intellectual property theft 20,000 manufacturing jobs. it happens every day. there are two companies left -- those that have been hacked and are trying to do something about it and those who do not know. that is all that is left. you see a nation state investing billions of their capital in their military and intelligence services to still commercial property and real purpose it. we have never seen anything like it. it is happening every day. we have the last part of that. itis the nation's they using to attack and denial of service for prepping the battlefield. military nation states have incorporated into military planning prepping the battlefield for several attacks. the russians went into georgia. they prepped the battlefield. they used to send in the bombers and artillery in the troops. now you start with cyber attacks, denial of service. the gas stations w
interested in being part of a return to the moon. russia publicly supported this position. there are many commercial and educational objectives that can be achieved at the moon. the case for human a mission to astroid should be visionary the focus on practical applications. this is a reflect did -- reflection of the values we hold. it is not just our dna. it is our values. be our nation not defined by blood or religion but a conscious choice. in shaping the international environment for space activity, the u.s. should build a more prosperous world in which our values are taken beyond. we should also exercise some humility in facing the unknown. in their time these projects were controversial and criticized. who today would have said they should not have been done? we have seen these efforts to define us as a nation who pioneers the next frontier. we are all in this together, white house, congress, international partners and many u.s. companies that operate the capabilities. in think this committee for holding this hearing today. i will be happy to answer any questions you might have. >> t
vladimir putin of russia has had a news conference and says a draft bill banning u.s. adoptions of russian children is a legitimate response to a new u.s. law that calls for sanctions on russians deemed to be human rights violators. but he has not committed to signing it. he said while the majority of americans to adopt russian children are "kind and honorable," protection for abuse of victims is insufficient. the bill faces more steps before it can reach the president of russia for this signature. three senators have written to the head of sony pictures, criticizing the movie "zero dark thirty" as grossly inadequate and misleading. it suggests that torture produced the tip that led to bin laden. the senate intelligence committee chairman dianne feinstein and and others say the summit president has an obligation to say that portrait in the hunt for bin laden was a fiction and not based on fact. the lawmakers say the cia detainee who provided significant information about bin laden did so before any harsh interrogation. congress is hearing about a state department report on the september 11
as russia has failed at newed a modernized, nukeler deterrents is a need of future modernization and yet this administration, resources -- has cut resources to begin planning for the upgrading and modernization of icbm's and nuclear-based systems that have largely been ignored. this trend simply cannot continue. but having recognized those problems that are there, it is also time to realize what this bill actually does that moves us as a nation forward. it will provide $552 billion, which is $2 billion more than the president requested, and that is a plus. it increases the pay for our all-voluntary forces by 1.7% and provides critical bonuses for those who are now working in harm's way. it keeps us safe with a military retirees and our veterans in regard to tricare and it rejects the administration's proposal to increase fees and co-pays -- co-payments on them. it deals with the issue of troop reduction in a responsible way by putting caps on the number of troop reductions that can be placed in a single year. it has a conscience clause for servicemen and chaplains. it implements the hyde
braun of russia. who was inspired by them -- i found out later and realized later that everyone on that list was between the age of 4 and 13. and seeing that innovation gives them the courage to try something really hard, and that is why they did the accomplishment. my first business was an aircraft factory and it worked primarily with the public, selling plans to people to build their own home built airplanes peiping -- airplanes. we did 15 airplanes and so plans for five of them. i think now, how the heck did i do that? 15 airplanes. what was the process from selling five of them? and i only sold paper, i only seoul plans. wow, i must have a lot of fun. the voyager was built on the profits from very easy plan sales. they were based on fun, grass- roots find. the public interface. this is where we took the voyager to oshkosh. i think this is before the world flight. this was a milestone accomplishment. the interesting thing about it technically, if you have an ultimate record that is not weight class or propeller or whatever, but overall record, how to record, speed record -- u
the relationship between belarus and its democrat neighbors and increase russia's stronghold on belarus in markets. belarus depends on russia for nearly all its energy supplies. the united states and european union must remain united and impose economic sanctions and have a single plan for actions regarding the promoigs of democratic process -- promotion of democratic process in belarus. mr. speaker, i appreciate the time coming down and i wish everybody a happy new year. the speaker pro tempore: the chair recognizes the gentleman from south carolina, mr. scott, for five minutes. mr. scott: thank you, mr. speaker. i rise today to say farewell to the house. i first want to say thank you to the wonderful people in the south carolina coast, from myrtle beach to my hometown of north charleston to hilton head, your support of the last three years has truly humbled me and inspired me. i also want to thank my friends, my colleagues and the members of the south carolina delegation. mr. clyburn, mr. wilson, mr. duncan, mr. gowdy and mr. mulvaney. we have a great group who truly understands we are here to r
. but competitors in china are, rush show were trading on a daily basis. -- my competitors in china and russia work training. this is a position of irritation of a triple jump. i was like a robot in the sense that everything i was doing, the hours i was putting in it, the morning, the afternoon, the evening, i trained all they basically. my first session, 10:00, i was basically of the rank by nine and my last session would be at 6:00-6:30. then i would go to the gym. i look back, no wonder i was in really good shape. >> where did that drive? how did that drive? where do you get that drive? >> we were talking earlier about the role of parents. when you had mentioned the tiger mom or the tiger parents, we did not have tiger parents. they were there to support me and be there in times when i needed a push culminated motivation. it is just one of those things when you have a passion and a vision. you do not see anything else. that is what drives you every day. >> you just got engaged. are you going to be a tiger mom. [laughter] >> looking at the way i was raised with a set of rules and just the way my
to play a role in the security council, the security council was unable, because of russia and china, which vetoed three times, and double the toe -- double veto, any actions against the assange regime. -- assad regime. should the international community's do actions beyond our outside the security council? it is not allowed for more casualties to be killed. syria, as a nation and the country, is threatened. they side effect of that, as we see right now -- more radicalization, from the country. we see increasing anti-western sentiment in syrian society. that is maybe more to hottest from other countries enough to join the syrian -- more jihadists to join the syrian regime. that is different from maybe the assad regime. he called all the freedom fighters as a terrorist or jihadists or al qaeda, like that. the situation or the change of dynamics of the revolution reflected on the dynamics of the free syrian army. there is no central command. there are different groups in different cities and different areas. since those areas are not geographically connected, it is very difficult, for
is the russians. there has been a back and forth now for months with russia but there was a hope that some. they would shift -- at some point that would shift. the idea that they may be preparing to graduate the citizens. the russians are saying they will not this about assad. and if they don't this about assad, i think that would make it extraordinarily difficult to reach some kind of negotiated solution. i think it is worth thinking about, but i decided to my mind the prospects are so slim that it is hard to put much hope in it at this point. >> questions? >> the russians are not going to deal with an iou. to me, that isn't tipping. for the russians. if they are -- to me that is a tipping point for the russians. >> what is the level of their foreign-exchange reserves? we don't know. there are reports of iran providing some amount of funding, but iran has its own issues with sanctions. my feelings on the russians is that i think what will happen with the russians is, they are not sentimental about assad. i think the russians are going to cut their losses and pull out, but not work time --
more people than religious faiths. i can only assume you were talking about soviet russia and nazi germany. were these regimes possible because of the uniformity? if that is the case, how did the myriad number of protestant denominations in the united states provide a unique defense against tyranny? >> i would not say -- i was not referring to just the soviet union and nazi germany. communist china killed far more of those two tyrannies combined, with no christian heritage to speak of. there are serious scholars that makes serious arguments that there is something and luther's temperament that was germanic. he was no democrat. the more, the merrier. religious factions or alternative sources of social authority. what you want is a society in which the state does not monopolized social authority. >> you talked extensively about religion in the united states contributing to [inaudible] there is one particular force that think they can inflict their views on this country. they insist said it was the intention of the founding fathers to create a christian equivalent of iran, which i do
this is headed in the right direction. it would be helpful if russia would participate in the effort to try to ensure there is a smooth political transition. >> the latest report to congress on afghanistan says in search of a tax increase slightly this year at a time when the u.s. still had 20,000 troops on the ground. how can security get better in this afghanistan as those troops leave? >> the reality is that in the time included there, there was a slight increase but the overall numbers, if you look at the entire year, the level of violence is down by almost 60% in kabul and in other populated areas. the violence levels are down. the fact is that the afghan army, the afghan police have got a much better at providing security in those areas we have transitioned to. everyone of those major populated areas that have been transitioned is now being secured by the afghan army and police. that is the hope for the future. building up that force is a key for our ability to succeed in this mission for the future. we will continue. the taliban is resilient. they will continue to try to conduct atta
baltimore sun" -- next to that, president obama suggests a revamp of the russia nuke deal. in "of the wall street journal" -- a "new york times" headline -- much about the phone call which occurred some months ago remains shrouded in mystery. it highlights the level of his anxiety about the current crop of candidates. we are talking about the proposal by house republicans to avoid the so-called fiscal cliff put out yesterday from the speaker's office with signatures from the rest of the leadership team. christine, a democratic caller, what do you think about it? you are on the air. caller: i have to agree with a couple of other people that called in. we have had 12 years of tax increases for the very wealthy in this country. theit has done nothing to stimulate jobs. it has done nothing to take our economy into a better shape. it was the bush tax cuts and the wars that drove us into this huge deficit that we have now. not the republicans' entitlements for this country and then we have neglected this country and the people of this country. we could have created jobs 10 times over. you have v
. this afternoon they'll take up a u.s.-russia trade bill. majority leader harry reid expecting to complete that bill today. they may also consider the nomination of michael shea to the u.s. district judge of connecticut and nomination of carol galante of california to be assistant secretary of housing and urban development. you can see live coverage of the senate on hour companion network, c-span2. also the president is meeting with the business round table. he is answering questions on the economy and debt talks. the president right now holding briefing with reporters and talking to members of the business round table. we are recording that and we plan to bring that to you later this afternoon. the president also will be speaking at the 2012 tribal nations conference. that will happen this afternoon also. plan to record that. we'll have is that for you on our schedule also. earlier today british chancellor of the exchequer gave a statement on the british economy. we'll bring that to you, too. now to live coverage of the u.s. house here on c-span. thank you, mr. speaker. the speaker pro te
cases russia. and these places, you know, many of these places, their costs are way lower than companies face here in the united states. so, if you start telling u.s. companies you have to pay higher wage s just because we're making a rule that says you have to do that, they're going to basically hire fewer u.s. workers and hire more overseas workers because they can do that. again, the way out of this trap is to develop skills that other people don't have. so that you are not one of thousands who can do some interchangeable job. if you are just sitting there with the same skills as many, many other people, you are stuck. i know this is very difficult, it's expensive to get skills, it takes time. we have a lot of people cutting corners, living with family, finding ways to get the education you need. it is absolutely true that peoples living standards are going down. one might only hope that our living standards are high enough that we can maybe cut a few corners, do what we need to and be competitive in the future. host: could you weigh in on this week's announcement by citigroup that th
progress on improving opportunities with russia but we have much more work to do in order to level the playing field regarding trade. other small businesses talk to me about the need to have a highly skilled work force that's better trained an prepared to take jobs in the 21st century. out of this grew my legislation, the back-to-work blueprint act which would inject money into the worker training program and ensure that skills of the worker match the needs of the employer. this strengthened my belief that we need to continue to promote stem education in america's schools, science, technology, engineering -- engineering and mathematics. skills necessary to make sure students are prepared to take jobs in the 21st century. nearly every business owner shared the importance, mr. speaker, of access to capital and credit for their businesses. capital is the life blood of our economy. i'm pleased that we focused in on this in this congress with the passage of the jobs act and other legislation that came out of the financial services committee. of course many employers and small business o
. if russia has been the staunchest ally of the bashar assad regime. meanwhile, parliament is getting ready to adopt a measure that would ban adoption of russian children by americans. last week, president obama signed into law a bill imposing sanctions on russians who are found to be connected with human-rights abuses. and back here in the states on wall street, stock futures are edging higher on emerging signs that the white house and congress may be moving closer to a budget deal. a new proposal for president obama drops his plan to raise taxes on individuals morning -- earning more than $200,000, and families making more than $250,000. he is now offering a new threshold of $400,000. the head of the -- ahead of the opening bell, futures are up about 25 points. those are headlines on c-span radio. >> one of the things that did surprise me a little, i did conduct a nationwide survey of gun owners, but among -- i did not conduct a nationwide survey of gun owners, but among those i talked with, i found out your way of thinking before and after you got a gun is very different. any law-abiding
is what is going to happen in russia. what will happen with some of the opposition which has been cracked down upon recently? also opposing the serious challenge of what is unfortunately increasing rule of led mayor putin. i am looking at a couple things right now and then i'd know when to give -- right now. i do not want to give a jump to other journalists. host: we have shown you the front page of "the daily beast" web site. guest: arianna from germantown, philadelphia, thank you very much for watching. host: coming up, we are going to have a look at the political year of 2012. we will be right back. ♪ guest: the taping system was top secret. the only people who knew for certain where my father, his secretary, and the secret service agent who installed it until president nixon made the idea of the white house taping famous and infamous. [applause] other systems were revealed to abandon the concept of secret taping can seem problematic. it is beyond a doubt that this is a unique and invaluable resource. on these tapes, history unfolds in the most dramatic possible way. >> caroline kenn
and the national debt. in 1994, he owed russia. the 1982 tax cuts, the bank reforms, that minimized our deductions for health care and let the health care costs skyrocket. then you have the savings and loan crisis. you could not write off your credit-card deductions. host: you were there for much of that debate. guest: a lot of that history that dave is mentioning is correct. there have been a lot of changes going on, ups and downs. the current debate is different, do not forget. after having surpluses at the end of the clinton administration, we went into debt almost a decade ago -- deficits almost a decade ago. the problems have gotten more difficult. at the moment, we have some interesting changes. you talk about 30 years since reagan. the country is getting older, so medicare, medicaid, social security costs more, but we have also had a lot of tax cuts. revenue is at the smallest amount since 1950. if we just got revenue back up to historical average, a deficit would be about $500 billion less than a career that is. the problem with that much more smaller. economists would then say that it is
states to protect our country from nation states like china and russia and now iran who seek to do us harm by using the internet. we will again aggressively pursue next year, with the help of my ranking member, actions needed, i believe, to protect the united states against what is the largest threat we face that we are not prepared to handle and that is the growing threat of cyberattack and cyberespionage. countering the profe live ration of weapons of mass destruction -- proliferation of weapons of mass destruction is an important part of our national security and we made sure that weapons and tests, research and development of new technology to maintain our intelligence agencies' technologically edge, and like the house-passed bill, this bill operates efficiencies in a number of areas, including information technology. satellite data and the procurement and operation of intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance platforms. the bill holds personnel levels, one of the first and largest biggest cost drivers, generally at last year's levels. even so the bill adds a limited number of
of a democracy. russia has elections. it is whether another candidate wins whether power is handed over to that candidate. iraq has not passed that milestone yet. what we had in 2011 was a relatively stable iraq, a lot of hopes. unfortunately, the situation has deteriorated politically over the last year. iraq has been less aligned with american interests and more aligned with iran the interests -- iranian interests in the syrian conflict. host: we are taking your phone calls. the lines are open. let us know if you served in iraq. we want to know that and your thoughts on what is happening the phone lines are open. i want to go back to the political situation in iraq. talk about his role today in iraq. before the segments started, he said he is not some hussein. guest: not saddam hussein in the sense that saddam hussein was a brutal dictator that killed thousands. he used weapons against the population to maintain his hold on power. maliki is nothing like that. he does appear to be an autocrat in the making. what is happening in iraq now is a political crisis. there is not much news cov
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